Lifebuoy creates innovative roti reminder

Lifebuoy has been stamping its handwashing message onto millions of rotis at Kumbh Mela, the world’s largest religious festival in India.

Branded bread spreads the handwashing message

roti bread with Lifebuoy handwashing message

Kumbh Mela is a mass Hindu pilgrimage, held in India every three years and attracting 100 million people. Lifebuoy partnered with more than 100 restaurants and cafés at the festival, as part of its ongoing campaign to raise awareness about good handwashing habits.

For every food order placed, the first roti carried the branded message “Lifebuoy se haath dhoye kya?” (Did you wash your hands with Lifebuoy?). The words were heat stamped onto the baked roti, without the use of ink, to ensure it was completely edible.

Washing hands with soap at the right time

“The ‘Roti Reminder’ gets a consumer’s attention at the exact time when handwashing is critical to help stop the spread of germs carrying preventable diseases. That is, right when consumers sit down to eat roti with their hands,” says Sudhir Sitapati, General Manager, Skin Cleansing, Hindustan Unilever Limited.

“The Kumbh Mela provides a unique opportunity to communicate this message to a large, predominantly small-town and rural population. In effect, this simple, clutter-breaking idea will help us reach out to a massive audience, at a fraction of the cost.”

Watch the Roti Reminder video on YouTube to find out more.

The importance of handwashing

More than 2.5 million branded rotis will have been eaten by the end of the month-long campaign.

Lifebuoy also placed soap in the wash rooms of each of the eateries and used banners and billboards to reach millions more people with its handwashing message.

The reach of the campaign has gone far beyond the festival. The novelty of branding food has generated a huge amount of media coverage and discussion across India, helping to spread the message of the importance of washing hands with soap before eating.

* Unleavened flatbreads eaten mainly by hand

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